Four Tools for Getting Started in Social Listening

Social listening refers to the practice of tracking what is said about a subject in the news, in blogs, and in other areas online. Usually, social listening connects with brand management, wherein companies monitor discussions around their products and reputations. But social listening is also a good strategy for building content knowledge and mastery toward an effective blog.

Many — perhaps too many — online tools exist for social listening. Some tools are web-based, others are app-based, and still others are desktop-based. Some feature syncing across platforms and devices, while others stand alone. Some even come right to your inbox.

This abundance creates the potential to customize these options to your preferences. Many tools offer similar functions, but though they might try, no single tool offers everything you need in one place. The best approach for starting involves choosing a few options, trying them for a while, and then evaluating their effectiveness.

What options you choose depends on where you “listen” most online. Listening can occur on news sites, social media sites, blogs and blog networks, hashtags and trending topics, dedicated content apps, and even general web searches, just for a few examples.

Below are four tools I use for social listening about documentary.

1. Google Alerts

A Google Alert delivers email notifications of web search results. Enter your keywords in the search box, and then tweak the frequency, sources, language, location, and quantity below. Add your email address and that’s it!

Setting up a Google Alert
Setting up a Google Alert is a simple process.

I created a daily alert for the word “documentary” in order to discover as wide of possibilities possible. The daily email arrives with 100+ links from both quality sources and some more questionable ones (read: ads). The expected news sources appear — Variety, The New York Times, indieWire — but some unexpected links include festival announcements, local newspapers, and crowdfunding campaign listings. One local news story announced the new director of the Hot Springs Film Festival, while another webpage announced a new program at the Big Sky Documentary Festival.

2. RSS Reader

RSS” stands for “really simple syndication.” Syndication is the process of distributing content to multiple outlets, such as newspapers or television channels. An RSS reader gathers content from multiple outlets into one place, such as an app or a website.

I use an RSS reader called Reeder 3 for MacOS. Reeder makes it simple to add a new feed:

Reeder 3 greatly simplifies the adding of RSS feeds.

The reader then will update with new content as it becomes available. Note that some RSS feeds show only a preview of the content and thus require you to visit the site, and some RSS feeds include ads. Reeder also allows grouping feeds, tagging links, and opening them in Firefox.

Sites such as Nonfics and the Center for Media and Social Impact offer the option to add their content to a reader. Social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter used to allow RSS, but in closing their platforms they eliminated the option.

3. Hootsuite

While an online presence manager first and foremost, Hootsuite also functions as a tool for social listening. It aggregates multiple social networking accounts from sites such Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube into one place.

Hootsuite allows the management of multiple social networking sites.

Within a specific social network, Hootsuite features the monitoring of multiple feeds. With Twitter, for example, feed options include mentions, retweets, followers, lists, and likes. I use some private lists on Twitter to follow some key accounts, and Hootsuite offers more direct access to them than using Twitter itself, which buries them under a menu.

For each social network, Hootsuite offers options for customizing your views.

Hootsuite comes in both web-based and tablet app-based access. Admittedly, I use Hootsuite the least among these options since it requires logging in to a website when using a desktop.

4. Email Newsletters

Multiple organizations and websites release free newsletters. (Some sites are a bit obnoxious about requesting you sign up with those pop-up screens.) When done well, these newsletters bring new information conveniently to your inbox.

The range of materials I have received so far has been interesting. New Day Films sent a brief one announcing new films. The International Documentary Association sent event notices, new releases announcements, and information overviews. The National Film Board of Canada has been excited about the nation’s 150th anniversary, and it has been sending links to all kinds of neat shorts and features such as “Canadian History in 10 NFB Films” and William Shatner singing “O Canada.”

Docs in Progress even invited me to me to submit an update about my documentary. (Maybe someday!)

The tools mentioned above are only a start with practicing social listening. The ones you use depend on your site goals, and the ones you begin with are just that: the beginning. The tools and their applications will change as your blog develops and grows.